Posts tagged bari

Ancient wooden door - Habo(Xaabo), Puntland (1975) Alternative style of wooden door - Habo(Xaabo), Puntland (1975) Ancient wooden windows - Habo(Xaabo), Puntland (1975) Alternative styles of wooden windows  - Habo(Xaabo), Puntland (1975) Alternative styles of wooden windows - Habo(Xaabo), Puntland (1975) Ancient house - Habo(Xaabo), Puntland (1975)

Habo (Xaabo), Puntland

Habo is a town steeped in history, but has been largely unexplored due to its remote location. Located east of Alula in the Bari province of Puntland, in the area known by the Romans as the Cape of Spices, Habo was an important place for the ancient cinnamon and Indian spice trade route. The town sustained damage during the Italian bombardment of the coastal regions in the late 1920s. 


Dr. Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke ( 1919 -1969 )

Dr. Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was born in 1919 to an aristocratic family in the Harardhere district of the Obbia Sultanate. He later moved to Mogadishu where he attended a government school and, after graduation, embarked on a career as a trader.
In May 1943 he became one of the early members of the first political party in Somalia – the Somali Youth League (SYL). The SYL’s founder, Yasin Haji Osman Sharmarke, was his first cousin. In 1944, when the British were in control of the administration of his country, Abdirashid entered the civil service. He continued to serve in the government service after 1950, when Somalia became a UN Trust Territory under Italian administration, rising to the position of Chief of the Department of Finance. While engaged in the government service by day, he pursued his education at night at the School of Public Administration in Mogadishu. He later earned a scholarship to study at the prestigious Sapienza University of Rome where he obtained a Ph.D. in Political Science in 1958.
After returning to Somalia in 1959, he was elected to the Legislative Assembly from the Gardo (Qardho) district. When Somalia gained its independence on July 1, 1960, he was appointed by President Aden Abdulle Osman as the Prime Minister of the Somali Republic. Sharmarke’s duties as Prime Minister saw him travel abroad extensively in pursuit of a non-aligned and neutral foreign policy. He remained Prime Minister until March 1964, when the first general elections were held.
The 1967 Presidential elections, conducted by a secret poll of National Assembly members, pitted former Prime Minister Sharmarke against President Aden Abdulle Osman. The central issue was moderation versus militancy on the pan-Somali question. Osman had stressed priority for internal development. Sharmarke, who had served as Prime Minister when pan-Somalism was at its height, was elected President of the Republic of Somalia. The new President nominated as Prime Minister Mohamed Haji Ibrahim Egal, who raised cabinet membership from thirteen to fifteen members and included representatives of every major clan family.
In September 1968, Somalia and Ethiopia agreed to establish commercial air and telecommunication links. The termination of the state of emergency in the border regions, which had been declared by Ethiopia in February 1964, permitted the resumption of free access by Somali pastoralists to their traditional grazing lands and the reopening of the road across Ethiopian territory between Mogadishu and Hargeysa. With foreign affairs a less consuming issue, the government’s energy and the country’s meager resources was now applied more effectively to the challenges of internal development. However, the relaxation of tensions had an unanticipated effect. The conflict with its neighbors had promoted Somalia’s internal political cohesion and solidified public opinion at all levels on at least one issue. As tension from that source subsided, old cleavages based on clan rivalries became more prominent. Resentment and discontent grew. It was during Abdirashid and Egal’s administration that the mass of Somalis became irrevocably alienated from the political system.
In 1968, President Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke would narrowly escape the first attempt on his life when a grenade exploded near the car that was transporting him back from the airport. Of the dissatisfied groups, the most significant element was the military who, since 1961, had remained outside politics. It had done so partly because the government had not called upon it for support and partly because, unlike most other African armed forces, the Somali National Army had a genuine external mission in which it was supported by all Somalis - that of protecting the borders with Ethiopia and Kenya.
The stage was set for a coup d’état. On October 15, 1969, the second attempt on President Sharmarke’s life would prove to be fatal. The President had been touring the country to witness the effects of a severe drought. During a stopover in Las Anod, police constable Abdulkadir Abdi Mohamed, a 22-year-old policeman who was sent to Las Anod on security strengthening for the Presidential visit, assassinated the President sending the country into shock.
At the time, Prime Minister Egal was overseas on an official visit, but upon his return Egal convened with members of his party to decide who should be Sharmarke’s replacement. After careful deliberation, the decision was made to replace Sharmarke with Haji Muse Boqor. The decision, especially when it became apparent that the selection would be confirmed by the National Assembly, angered certain members of the military.
On October 21, 1969, while the country had just finished observing the traditional 5 days of mourning, members of the military took over strategic points in Mogadishu, rounded up government officials, suspended the constitution, abolished the National Assembly, and banned political parties, effectively putting an end to the brief period of democracy in Somalia. Sharmarke would be the last democratically elected President of Somalia.

Dr. Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke ( 1919 -1969 )

Dr. Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke was born in 1919 to an aristocratic family in the Harardhere district of the Obbia Sultanate. He later moved to Mogadishu where he attended a government school and, after graduation, embarked on a career as a trader.

In May 1943 he became one of the early members of the first political party in Somalia – the Somali Youth League (SYL). The SYL’s founder, Yasin Haji Osman Sharmarke, was his first cousin. In 1944, when the British were in control of the administration of his country, Abdirashid entered the civil service. He continued to serve in the government service after 1950, when Somalia became a UN Trust Territory under Italian administration, rising to the position of Chief of the Department of Finance. While engaged in the government service by day, he pursued his education at night at the School of Public Administration in Mogadishu. He later earned a scholarship to study at the prestigious Sapienza University of Rome where he obtained a Ph.D. in Political Science in 1958.

After returning to Somalia in 1959, he was elected to the Legislative Assembly from the Gardo (Qardho) district. When Somalia gained its independence on July 1, 1960, he was appointed by President Aden Abdulle Osman as the Prime Minister of the Somali Republic. Sharmarke’s duties as Prime Minister saw him travel abroad extensively in pursuit of a non-aligned and neutral foreign policy. He remained Prime Minister until March 1964, when the first general elections were held.

The 1967 Presidential elections, conducted by a secret poll of National Assembly members, pitted former Prime Minister Sharmarke against President Aden Abdulle Osman. The central issue was moderation versus militancy on the pan-Somali question. Osman had stressed priority for internal development. Sharmarke, who had served as Prime Minister when pan-Somalism was at its height, was elected President of the Republic of Somalia. The new President nominated as Prime Minister Mohamed Haji Ibrahim Egal, who raised cabinet membership from thirteen to fifteen members and included representatives of every major clan family.

In September 1968, Somalia and Ethiopia agreed to establish commercial air and telecommunication links. The termination of the state of emergency in the border regions, which had been declared by Ethiopia in February 1964, permitted the resumption of free access by Somali pastoralists to their traditional grazing lands and the reopening of the road across Ethiopian territory between Mogadishu and Hargeysa. With foreign affairs a less consuming issue, the government’s energy and the country’s meager resources was now applied more effectively to the challenges of internal development. However, the relaxation of tensions had an unanticipated effect. The conflict with its neighbors had promoted Somalia’s internal political cohesion and solidified public opinion at all levels on at least one issue. As tension from that source subsided, old cleavages based on clan rivalries became more prominent. Resentment and discontent grew. It was during Abdirashid and Egal’s administration that the mass of Somalis became irrevocably alienated from the political system.

In 1968, President Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke would narrowly escape the first attempt on his life when a grenade exploded near the car that was transporting him back from the airport. Of the dissatisfied groups, the most significant element was the military who, since 1961, had remained outside politics. It had done so partly because the government had not called upon it for support and partly because, unlike most other African armed forces, the Somali National Army had a genuine external mission in which it was supported by all Somalis - that of protecting the borders with Ethiopia and Kenya.

The stage was set for a coup d’état. On October 15, 1969, the second attempt on President Sharmarke’s life would prove to be fatal. The President had been touring the country to witness the effects of a severe drought. During a stopover in Las Anod, police constable Abdulkadir Abdi Mohamed, a 22-year-old policeman who was sent to Las Anod on security strengthening for the Presidential visit, assassinated the President sending the country into shock.

At the time, Prime Minister Egal was overseas on an official visit, but upon his return Egal convened with members of his party to decide who should be Sharmarke’s replacement. After careful deliberation, the decision was made to replace Sharmarke with Haji Muse Boqor. The decision, especially when it became apparent that the selection would be confirmed by the National Assembly, angered certain members of the military.

On October 21, 1969, while the country had just finished observing the traditional 5 days of mourning, members of the military took over strategic points in Mogadishu, rounded up government officials, suspended the constitution, abolished the National Assembly, and banned political parties, effectively putting an end to the brief period of democracy in Somalia. Sharmarke would be the last democratically elected President of Somalia.


Ancient Door - Bandar Qasim ( Bosaso), Puntland 
A beautifully crafted ancient door in the traditional Arab-influenced architectural style popular in the coastal regions of Puntland. ( Photo date: 1925).

Ancient Door - Bandar Qasim ( Bosaso), Puntland 

A beautifully crafted ancient door in the traditional Arab-influenced architectural style popular in the coastal regions of Puntland. ( Photo date: 1925).


Mihrab of ancient mosque - Bandar Ziyada - Qaw, Puntland Ruins of ancient building - Bosaso, Puntland Coast West of Bosaso, Puntland Ruins of Bandar Ziyada - Qaw, Puntland Ruins with an ancient door - Bandar Ziyada - Qaw, Puntland Ruins of ancient building - Bosaso, Puntland Coast towards Bandar Ziyada - Qaw , Puntland

The Ruins of Bandar Ziyada & Bandar Qasim

Bandar Qasim ( Bosaso), known as Mosylon by the ancient Greeks, is a strategically located port city in the Bari region of Puntland. The Periplus of the Erythraean Sea indicates that ancient Greek merchants sailed to Bandar Qasim, providing notes about the strategic and geographical location.

Located just outside of Bandar Qasim, Bandar Ziyada (Qaw) is an ancient town that was active in the Horn of Africa’s ancient trade system. The town was destroyed by the British colonialists when colonial rule divided the Somali territory into five parts since it lay on the borderline between British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland.


Dhuudo, Puntland 1975  Wadi - Dhuudo, Puntland 1975 Ruins of a fort built by Boqor Osman - Dhuudo, Puntland 1975 Ruins of a fort built by Boqor Osman - Dhuudo, Puntland 1975 Ruins of a fort built by Boqor Osman - Dhuudo, Puntland 1975

Dhuudo, Bari - 1975

Dhuudo is a historic village located 100 km east of Qardho town in the Bari region of Puntland.


Ruins in the distance - Qandala, Puntland 1984 Ruins of small fort - Qandala, Puntland 1984 Qandala, Puntland 1984 Qandala, Puntland 1984 Qandala beach - Qandala, Puntland 1984 Huuri ( a small boat ) - Qandala, Puntland 1984 Huuri ( a small boat ) - Qandala, Puntland 1984 Beden (an ancient maritime vessel that remains the longest surviving sewn boat in the Horn of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula) - Qandala, Puntland 1984 Huuri ( a small boat ) - Qandala, Puntland 1984 Qandala beach - Qandala, Puntland 1984

Qandala, Bari - 1984

Qandala is an ancient port city located on the Gulf of Aden. A diary dated to 50 CE indicates that Qandala was a trade centre for cinnamon and spices. This trade seems to be evidence that the people were seafarers who traveled to the Far East, as far as present-day India and China.

Apart from gums, ivory, animal skins and incense, the rise of the coastal trading post was due to the commercial opportunities the port generated. Ancient migration routes joined Gulf countries to Qandala. Archaeological evidence suggests that Qandala may have been an important trading center in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, participating in East Africa’s trade with the Middle East and Asia. Qandala City’s early name was “Gacanka Hodonka”, which means Gulf Of Prosperity referring to the Qandala community and to the successful traders of East Africa. One of the largest exports of Qandala is a traditional gum, which is exported to several countries in the Arabian Peninsula, Asia and Australia. 


Colonization

                           Capture of Boqor Cusmaan

Italian depiction of the capture of Boqor Cusmaan by Italian and allied forces in 1927.                                                                

           Capture of Bargal

Hoisting of the Italian flag following the destruction and capture of Bargal. 

The Italian and British conquest of the Sultanates  (in 1920-1927) suppressed the peoples’ resistance and destroyed all political, economic and commercial structures. The Italian fascist authorities were more repressive than the British, as reflected by the economic policies they applied to the northeastern regions. For instance, import-export trade and all the commercial transactions with the previously mentioned traditional markets were suspended and forcibly replaced with Italian trade companies, which imported consumer goods from Italy and exported salt, frankincense, hides, skin and agricultural cash crops (banana and cotton) to Italy through Mogadishu.

     Prince Umberto II of Italy, Alula Somalia

March 22, 1928. The arrival of Prince Umberto II of Italy to Alula.

               Crown Prince of Italy Bargal

Crown Prince in front of the monument to the fallen Italian forces (Bargal).

The suspension of trade markets and political structures of the former Sultanates by the colonial authorities had a devastating effect on the livelihood security, famine coping mechanism and employment/income earning opportunities of the northeastern communities. This time period saw the migration of large numbers pastoralists, merchants and fishermen to the southern regions of Somalia, as well as to the nearby Arab states and East Africa in order to seek employment and trading opportunities. Furthermore, the Sultan of The Warsangeli was exiled to the Seychelles Island by the British authorities and the Sultan of Obbio and the Boqor of Migiurtinia, their families, relations and key collaborators (such as the traditional elders) were forcibly deported by the Italians to Mogadishu.

                Sultan Ali Yusuf exiled

The Sultan of Obbia ( right ) and family being exiled to Mogadishu. 

The deportation and exile of the Sultans, the compulsory conscription of more than 25,000 pastoralists (Italo-Ethiopian war of 1935-36) and destruction of economic, trade and political structures were all aimed to prevent or repress internal resistance & rebellion and to deplete & weaken the manpower resources of the conquered regions.

                   Boqor Cusmaan in Mogadishu

Boqor Cusmaan ( middle ) and family in Mogadishu with the Governor of Italian Somaliland (De Vecchi). 

Due to its location, Hafun was selected as the capital of Italian Somaliland. The once bustling capital was later reduced to ruins through heavy shelling by the British in 1942 (during the Second World War) destroying most of the historical buildings.

In 1943, the Somali Youth League ( then known as the Somali Youth Club), the political party that brought Somalia to independence in 1960, was founded by Yasin Osman Sharmarke. Sharmarke was the son of a noble chief from the Sultanate of Obbio and cousin of Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke who would later became President of Somalia. Timiro Cukaash Guleed, who many believe the fictional character ‘Hawo Tako' was based off of, was the first female member of the Somali Youth League. A poet and freedom fighter, Cukaash would play an integral part of the Somali independence movement. The Italian colonial masters murdered her husband and arrested a pregnant Cukaash, forcing her to give birth to her first child in prison. She spent the next two years behind bars.

In 1947, Ali Mire Awale wrote “Soomaaliyeey toosoo” ( the current Somali National Anthem). A few years later in 1954, Mohamed Awale Liban created the Somali flag.

                  

First hoisting of the Somali flag 1954. Photo taken in the former territory of Migiurtinia, the last Somali territory to be colonized.

Liban chose the blue color to represent the United Nations who helped Somalis reach their dream of independence, the white color represented peace and prosperity, and the star represented the five Somali regions which had been divided by the colonial powers.


Pre-Imperalism

The northeast region of Somalia has, since August 1st, 1998, been referred to as Puntland State of Somalia. The territory is characterized by vast semi-arid range lands on which nomadic pastoralists raise herds of camels, goats and sheep. There are also a number of small towns and small coastal settlements where people practice rudimentary fishing.

The economy is primarily dependent on pastoralism, the livestock trade, and the import and export of goods at the port of Bosaaso on the northeast coast. Stretching from the Gulf of Aden and the Indian Ocean to the north and east, to south Mudug region in central Somalia and bordering Ethiopia and Somaliland in the west, the area encompasses the traditional territory of the Harti clan group of the Darood clan-family and a number of other Darood clans and is considered one of the most homogeneous Somali regions. 

Although pre-colonial Somali society did not have a national government with modern structures and clearly defined international borders, the northeast region had traditional structures of government dating from the 18th century. These traditional structures of government included:

The Sultanate of Migiurtinia (mid 18th century - 1927)

The Sultanate of Obbio (1878–1925) 

The Warsangeli Sultanate of Sanaag (1896–1925) 

The Dervish State (1899 -1920)

These Sultanates had administrative and military structures, which safeguarded security, social welfare and political stability until they were disrupted by colonial powers (the Italians in the first two Sultanates and the British in the last two).
As Prof. Said Samatar of Rutgers University put it:

In precolonial times the only states worthy of the name in the Somali peninsula had been the Migiurtinia Sultanate of Boqor, or king, Cismaan Mohamuud and the kingdom of Obbia (Hobyo) belonging to Cismaan’s nephew, the dour Yuusuf Ali Keenadiid. These were both highly centralized states with all the organs and accoutrements of an integrated modern state - a hereditary nobility, titled aristocrats, a functioning bureaucracy, a flag, an army and a significant network of foreign relations with embassies abroad.

Nowhere else in Somalia did anything even remotely comparable ever arise, except perhaps the Ujuuraan on the Shabeelle valley and Adal on the northwestern coast, both states having reached the apogee of power in the sixteenth century. In modern times the Migiurtin stand alone, absolutely alone, in having created a centralized state.

The Warsangeli Sultanate was noted for its robust tax-based centralized administration and trade and commercial relations existed between the Sultanates, the Indian sub-continent and Arabian Gulf states. For instance, ad valorem taxation systems, export of livestock, animal and agro-forestry products and import of consumer goods thrived in the Sultanate of Migiurtinia during the second half of the 19th century and first quarter of the 20th century.

In Puntland, “Isim” (singular) or “Isimo” (plural), the traditional titled leaders or paramount chiefs, are usually crowned in a traditional ceremony known as “’Aano-Shub” (meaning crowning with milk, pouring milk on the head) or “’Aleemo-Saar” (meaning showering with green leaves). The highest traditional position for the Darood clan is the Boqor (king), with other positions denoted as Ugaas, Garaad, Islan, Beeldaaje, Sultan, Qud, Caaqil (chief), Nabaddon, Samadoon and Oday.

Boqor

Boqor Cusmaan Boqor Maxamuud (King of Migiurtinia).

Sultan Ali Yusuf Kenadid

Sultan Yusuf Ali Keenadiid (Sultan of Obbio).

Sultan Shire

Sultan Mohamoud Ali Shire (Sultan of The Warsangeli Sultanate also know as “Sovereign of the House of North East of Somaliland Sultanate” and “Sultan of Sultans of Somaliland”).

The traditional life of the northeast regions was disrupted from 1900-1920 by the turmoil of battles waged by Sayid Mohamed Abdulle Hassan against European and Ethiopian colonization of Somali territories, and subsequently from 1923-1927 by the resistance of the Sultanates of Obbio and Miguirtina to Italian direct rule.

In the beginning of 1920, the British struck the Dervish settlements with a well-coordinated air and land attack and inflicted a stunning defeat. The forts of Hassan were damaged and his army suffered great losses. The British Royal Air Force’s (R.A.F.) bombing Jidali Fort was the first aerial bombardment of its kind in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Jidali

Jidali 2

Soon after Hassan’s defeat, the British, dreading the prospect of another several decades of costly and difficult battles with yet another Somali potentate, set about attempting to neutralize Sultan Shire’s influence. Shire was secretly invited to a conference in Yemen, ostensibly to discuss possible ways of settling differences. After a short session before the meeting was scheduled to begin, he was taken into custody by the British authorities. Sultan Shire was later tried without proper representation in a kangaroo court.

In 1925, Omar Samatar, one of the military chiefs of Sultan Ali Yusuf of The Sultanate of Obbio, led a rebellion against the Italians that culminated in the recapturing of El-Buur on November 9, 1925. Soon the rebellion expanded to the local population and the region went into revolt as El-Dheere also came under the control of Omar Samatar. The Italian forces tried to recapture El-Buur but they were repulsed.

On November 15,1925 the Italians retreated to Bud Bud and on the way they were ambushed and suffered heavy casualties. As a consequence of the death of the commander of the operations and the effect of two failed operations intended to overcome the El-Buur mutiny, the spirit of Italian troops began to wane. Meanwhile, the rebellion was gaining sympathy across the country and as far a field as Western Somaliland.

The fascist government was surprised by the setback in Obbio (Hobyo). The whole policy of conquest was collapsing under their nose. The El-Buur episode drastically changed the strategy of Italy as it revived memories of the Adwa fiasco when Italy had been defeated by Abyssinia. Governor De Vecchi took the situation seriously, and to prevent any more failure he requested two battalions from Eritrea to reinforce his troops, and assumed lead of the operations. Rome instructed De Vecchi that he was to receive the reinforcement from Eritrea, but that the commander of the two battalions was to temporarily assume the military command of the operations and De Vecchi was to stay in Muqdisho and confine himself to other colonial matters. Fascist Italy was poised to re-conquer the Sultanate by any means necessary. To undermine the resistance, and before the Eritrean reinforcement could arrive, De Vecchi began to instil distrust among the local people by buying the loyalty of some of them. In fact, these tactics had better results than the military campaign, and the resistance began to gradually wear down. Given the anarchy which would follow, the new policy was a success.

On the military front, on December, 26, 1925 Italian troops finally overran El-Buur, and the forces of Omar Samatar were compelled to retreat to Western Somaliland. Samatar led some followers across the border into Ethiopia and campaigned against Italians in the Ogaden at frontier posts.

By neutralizing the Sultanate of Obbio, the fascists could concentrate on Migiurtinia. In early October 1924, E. Coronaro, the new Alula commissioner, presented Boqor Cusmaan Boqor Maxamuud with an ultimatum to disarm and surrender. Meanwhile, Italian troops began to pour into the sultanate in anticipation of this operation. While landing at Hafun and Alula, the sultanate’s troops opened fire on them. Fierce fighting ensued and to avoid escalating the conflict and to press the fascist government to revoke their policy, Boqor Cusmaan tried to open a dialogue. However, he failed, and again fighting broke out between the two parties. Following this disturbance, on 7 October the Governor instructed Coronaro to order the Boqor to surrender; to intimidate the people he ordered the seizure of all merchant boats in the Alula area. At Hafun, the Italians bombarded and destroyed all the boats in the area.

The destruction of Hafun fort.


On 13 October, Coronaro was to meet Boqor Cusmaan at Baargaal to press for his surrender. Under siege already, Boqor Cusmaan was playing for time. However, on 23 October,  Boqor Cusmaan sent an angry response to the Governor defying his order. Following this a full scale attack was ordered in November. Baargaal was bombarded and destroyed to the ground.

The bombardment of Baargaal.

The aftermath.


The attempt of the colonizers to suppress the region erupted into an explosive confrontation. The Italians were meeting fierce resistance on many fronts.

Eritrean Ascari's deployed to Bargal

October 30, 1925. Eritrean Ascari’s following the fall of Bargal to Italian forces. The Ascari’s landed on the beach of Bargal on Oct 28, 1925 but were attacked by rebel forces and forced to find safety inside in a mosque. The battle would last for 22 hour. 

In December 1925, led by the charismatic leader Hersi Boqor, son of Boqor Cusmaan, the sultanate forces drove the Italians out of Hurdiyo and Hafun, two strategic coastal towns. Another contingent attacked and destroyed an Italian communications center at Cape Guardafui, at the tip of the Horn. In retaliation, and to demoralize the resistance, Italian warships were ordered to target and bombard the sultanate’s coastal towns and villages. In the interior the Italian troops confiscated livestock. 

After a violent confrontation Italian forces captured Eyl, which until then had remained in the hands of Hersi Boqor. In response to the unyielding situation, Italy called for reinforcements from their other colonies, notably Eritrea.

Ibrahim Farag

Eritrean Ascari Ibrahim Mohamed Farag. For his heroics in the region, Farag was awarded the Gold Medal for Military Valor and promoted to Muntar Ascari Corps of the Royal Navy.

With their arrival at the closing of 1926, the Italians began to move into the interior where they had not been able to venture since their first seizure of the coastal towns. Their attempt to capture the Dharoor Valley was resisted, and ended in failure.

De Vecchi had to reassess his plans as he was being humiliated on many fronts. After one year of exerting full force he could not yet manage to gain total control over the sultanate. In spite of the fact that the Italian navy sealed the sultanate’s main coastal entrance, they could not succeed in stopping them from receiving arms and ammunition through it. It was only early 1927 when they finally succeeded in shutting the northern coast of the sultanate, thus cutting arms and ammunition supplies for Migiurtinia. By this time, the balance had tilted to the Italians’ side, and in January 1927 they began to attack with massive force, capturing Iskushuban, at the heart of Migiurtinia. Hersi Boqor unsuccessfully attacked and challenged the Italians at Iskushuban.  By the end of the 1927, the Italians had nearly taken control of the sultanate. Hersi Boqor and his troops retreated to Ethiopia in order to rebuild their forces, but were unable to retake their territories, effectively ending the Campaign of the Sultanates. Migiurtinia was the last region to fall to the Italian colonists.


 Alula ( Caluula)  Flying over mountains Alula ( Caluula) - 1935  Alula ( Caluula) - 1935  Alula ( Caluula)  Alula ( Caluula) Cape Guardafui (Ras Asir), 1890  Elder - Alula ( Caluula) Cape Guardafui (Ras Asir) -  Le Lion Rock, 1907

Northeastern Bari, Puntland ( 1890 - 1935)

A collection of illustrations from the Alula - Cape Guardafui area.


First hoisting of the Somali flag First hoisting of the Somali flag
First hoisting of Somali flag in 1954 ( Location: Scusciuban,Bari).

Birth of The Somali Flag

Today marks the 58th anniversary of the adoption of the flag of the Somali people. The flag was created by Somali scholar Mohammed Awale Liban after he had been selected by the Somali labour trade union to come up with a design in preparation for independence. It was officially adopted on October 12, 1954.

The five-pointed white Star of Unity in its center represents the Somali ethnic group found in Djibouti, the Ogaden region in Ethiopia, the North Eastern Province in Kenya, and the former British Somaliland and Italian Somaliland territories ( present-day Somalia).

The flag’s light blue backdrop was originally influenced by the flag of the United Nations, in recognition of the UN’s role in Somalia’s transition to independence during the trusteeship period.


Coastal Sanaag & Bari, Puntland - Mid to late 1840s

Illustrations done by French explorer Charles Guillain, between 1846 and 1848, during his visits to the coastal Sanaag and Bari regions of Puntland.


Hafun Fort Hafun Fort destruction

Hafun, Puntland - 1920s

The bombardment of Hafun Fort by Italian forces.


                     Boqor Osman 1927

Photo of Boqor Cusmaan Boqor Maxamuud ( Boqor Osman Mahamud) of the northern sultanate in Muqdisho following his capture by the Italians.

Background:

De Vecchi, the governor of Italian Somaliland, had to reassess his plans as he was being humiliated on many fronts. After one year of exerting full force he could not yet manage to gain a result over the sultanate. In spite of the fact that the Italian navy sealed the sultanate’s main coastal entrance, they could not succeed in stopping them from receiving arms and ammunition through it. It was only early 1927 when they finally succeeded in shutting the northern coast of the sultanate, thus cutting arms and ammunition supplies. By this time, the balance had tilted to the Italian’s side, and in January 1927 they began to attack with a massive force, capturing Iskushuban, at the heart of the sultanate. Hersi Boqor unsuccessfully attacked and challenged the Italians at Iskushuban. To demoralise the resistance, ships were ordered to raze and bombard the sultanate’s coastal towns and villages. In the interior the Italian troops confiscated livestock. By the end of the 1927 the Italians had nearly taken control of the sultanate. 

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 Hafun (Xaafuun), Puntland - 1928

Hafun (Xaafuun), Puntland - 1928


Grand Assembly of Warriors ( Alula, Puntland) Ras Orbe ( Dourboh), Puntland Lagoon ( Alula, Puntland) Ras Hafun, Puntland Bender Meraya, Puntland Bender Meraya, Puntland Warriors on Horseback (Hafun, Puntland)

Coastal Puntland - 1880 (Part 2)

The above are illustrations by a French explorer who visited several coastal towns and villages in the “Cape of Spices” (the north-eastern tip of Africa).